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Chloe Grace Moretz on Growing Up, Hillary Clinton and Hollywood Sexism

  

One year ago, the Democratic National Convention was buzzing with celebrities like Meryl Streep, Lena Dunham, and Elizabeth Banks. But none of them had closer proximity to the candidate than Chloë Grace Moretz, who took the stage 45 minutes before Hillary Clinton.

“It was one of the happiest moments of my life, that’s for sure,” recalls Moretz, 20, on a recent afternoon, sitting with her two-month-old pug, Ruby. The actress had such a plum spot at the DNC because organizers were hoping she’d reach first-time millennial voters.

Moretz has something in common with her multitasking generation: She knows what it’s like to burn out as a teenager. After appearing in dozens of movies since she was a pint-size kid, Moretz realized at 18 that she needed a yearlong break. She left her home in Los Angeles for a solitary vacation in Tulum, Mexico, embarked on a few road trips, dated and spent time with her friends — a period that she likens to the gap year that high school students may take before heading to college.

It was one of the most important things I’ve done yet in my life,” Moretz tells Variety. “It allowed me to stand back and go, ‘I’ve had a career since I was six years old, I’ve made over 52 films and who am I?’

Many know Moretz from films such as “Kick-Ass” and “Carrie.” Outside her on-screen persona, she’s also cultivated a robust following on social media, with 13.4 million Instagram fans browsing through her feed that’s more defined by black-and-white portraits than selfies. Her most notorious internet moment came last year when she got in a nasty Twitter feud with Kim Kardashian West over posting a nude selfie. “It’s sad for her to reach out like that to a young woman,” says Moretz, who hasn’t interacted with Kardashian West since. “There’s a lot of woman-on-woman hate.

Moretz has always portrayed strong female characters. There was her feminist college student in “Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising,” as well as supporting roles in “Laggies” and “Clouds of Sils Maria,” where she played a deliciously self-absorbed teenage movie star. But now, the recharged Moretz is entering her 20s with a different mantra. “I want to do things that introduce messages to people, and they show a side of life that maybe people aren’t privy to,” she explains.

The first script she read after her hiatus was “The Miseducation of Cameron Post,” in which she stars as a young girl forced into a gay conversion therapy center. She shot the movie during the election, whose outcome left her stunned. She went to bed early on election night because she had to be up at dawn for her call time. When she woke, she looked at her phone and screamed. “I was like, ‘Oh, my gosh. I’m going to work on a gay conversion therapy movie, which Pence supports,’” she recalls, referring to the vice president.

Full interview: variety.com

 

Categories Interviews Magazines Photo shoots Photos

GLAMOUR cover star: Chloe Grace Moretz

 

As well as talking about taking on Twitter trolls, and working her “ass off” on screen, she opens up about dating Brooklyn Beckham, whom she met two years ago at SoulCycle: “One of the reasons we’re dating him is great is that we both get what it means to have our live twisted and torn apart and faked,” she told us.

Seriously, you don’t know how often I’m just described as ‘his girlfriend’. And you think: ‘well, I’ve also been acting for 13 years, but don’t worry’.

One of the most exciting young talents in Hollywood – most recently proving her comedy chops alongside Seth Rogen and Rose Byrne in Bad Neighbours 2, and soon to start filming on the much-anticpated adaptation of The Little Mermaid – Chloe’s not afraid of being labelled outspoken:

‘Do you really want to stir the pot?’ I’d get asked early on. And once I’d thought about it, I decided that, yeah, actually, I do. Because that one person who speaks out ignites millions of other people to speak out…

On the well-reported Hollywood pay gap she says: “Feminism for me has always just been about equality: me being worth exactly the same as my male counterparts, but not more than them – unless what I do is of a higher equality.

Source: glamourmagazine.co.uk

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InStyle Magazine

   

This month, Team InStyle jetted off to LA to shoot our June coverstar, the gorgeous and very cool Chloe Moretz. Shot on Venice Beach, props included a bin and errr a shopping trolley. Talk about glam! Known for her on-point style, Chloe unsurprisingly loved our edit of luxe designer labels, so much so, that she even bought the Celine look post-shoot.
But it wasn’t just fashion that she was happy to chat about. Over pizza (and vanilla frosted cake) she spilled on politics, dating and why she thinks girl squads are more exclusionary than empowering. Here’s a sneak peek of what she had to say but for more check out the June issue, that hits shelves on the 28th of April…

On speaking her mind on social media…
A few months ago, Chloe called out Kim Kardashian over her nude selfie. ‘I truly hope you realize how important setting goals are for young women, teaching them we have so much more to offer than just our bodies,’ she tweeted directly to her. Kardashian, replied: ‘Let’s all welcome @ChloeGMoretz to twitter, since no one knows who she is.’‘ Chloe says of the Twitter spat: ‘I’ve never been afraid to have my own voice and to speak my own mind. I wasn’t catty about it,’ she says. ‘A lot of people came back and said, “You’re wrong.” I was like, “You might disagree with me and that’s great. Let’s have a debate.” At least I believe in something.

On why she turned down an invitation to join Taylor Swift’s girl squad…
No one really puts herself in the shoes of the girl that’s not in the squad – and that was always me. I didn’t go to school. I had all brothers. I was a dork.

On why she finds dating ‘horrible and weird’….
You already know what I look like in a bathing suit. You know what I look like in a sex scene. You know what I look like when I say “I love you” to someone. You’ve already seen it all.’ Coupling with someone like Beckham, who’s savvy about the exposure that comes with fame, must be even worse. ‘It creates a mass frenzy and they follow you in separate cars so you can’t just run around and share little silly and cute moments.

On what she thinks of Donald Trump…
At first, I was like, “Look at this silly, loud-mouthed dude running for President. That will never be a reality.” Then it became this really strong, nasty, dark undercurrent supporting him and funding him to influence the masses. It’s shocking.’ Right now, it’s all about campaigning for Hillary Clinton. Moretz has volunteered for the Democratic Presidential hopeful and attended fundraisers. ‘I was so star-struck when I met her that I couldn’t breathe. I cried to her face!

Source: InStyle

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Chloë Moretz on “The 5th Wave”, the importance of badass female roles, and the need for more female directors

   

We’ve known the name Chloë Moretz for almost a decade, which is quite a feat given she’s only 18 years old. She’s already carved out a successful career playing numerous badass parts, namely as an 11-year-old Hit-Girl in Kick-Ass. And her latest film, The 5th Wave, shows her taking on yet another strong role.
In it she plays the lead character, a regular teenager called Cassie who fights to survive following an alien apocalypse. It’s based on the YA novel of the same name by Rick Yancey. And rather than use her previous experience of action films, she actually had to train to be more “normal” and forget how to use guns. We invited Chloë into BuzzFeed UK’s London office to open up about the role. We discussed everything from how the “Wavers” will react to the film adaptation, to the pressure of bringing a much-loved book to life, to the importance of female roles in movies and the lack of female directors being used in the industry. Here’s what went down…

What was it about this film that first appealed to you?
Chloë Moretz: For me, it was when I first read the book. And what I liked about it is that she, Cassie Sullivan, the character that I play, she didn’t feel incredibly masculine, she didn’t feel incredibly feminine, it felt very much like a realistic depiction of the generation that we’re living in. You know there’s this “millennial generation” – it felt like a very adequate depiction of young women and me right now.

The book and movie is aimed at these millennials. Do you think a lot of girls and even boys the same age will see themselves in this movie?
CM: Definitely. I think that’s the interesting thing about it is it kind of breaks the stereotypical, you know, being played to one specific gender and age range. I went to the movie and saw it with my whole family – which is four older brothers, my oldest brother is 34; my mom is in her fifties – and all of us, for completely separate reasons, enjoyed the movie. And I thought that was really interesting, that kind of tells you a lot about the project in the sense that it is a much broader spectrum than this incredibly concentrated, tiny focused group that it’s supposed to be based for, but it’s not.

It’s based on the books. Is it weird being part of this kind of movie compared to your others because there’s already such a huge fan base out there already?
CM: People have loved this book for much longer than when we decided to make it into a movie. I think it gives you a sense of good nerves. It’s good nerves that you feel pushed to do it justice. You know the feeling – every fan knows the feeling of being a huge fan of a book series or a book and going to the theatre and sitting down and being so heavily disappointed. I think because I was a fan of the book predominantly, I put on my own pressure, my own fan-based pressure on myself to do Cassie justice. So I think that you can really see that in the film with all the characters and with the film as a whole.

There seems to be a big surge at the moment to turn YA books into movies. Do you think this one has the potential to be as big as The Hunger Games, The Maze Runner et al?
CM: I mean, I think the world is kind of changing and there’s so many ways for things to go. I think we have seen a lot of projects that this movie looks like but the thing is that this movie isn’t all that it seems. It’s modern, it’s real, it’s really a great character-based story for young adults to be able to kind of fall in love with. And also it’s sci-fi, there’s fun thriller sci-fi wild elements to it and it’s incredibly fearful – in a lot of moments you’re left on the edge of your seat. So it’s very different from the other films and I think it’s hard for people to differentiate their brains from what we’ve seen over the past eight years – but if they did I think they could see the movie for more than what they think it is.

Full interviewbuzzfeed