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75th Venice Film Festival

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Public Appearances > Events from 2018 > September 01 – ‘Suspiria’ Premiere at the 75th Venice Film Festival
Public Appearances > Events from 2018 > September 01 – ‘Suspiria’ Photocall at the 75th Venice Film Festival
Candid Appearances > 2018 > September 01 – Arriving at the Excelsior hotel at the Venice Film Festival

Categories Interviews Photo shoots Photos

Chloë Grace Moretz on why she’s Hollywood’s most outspoken LGBTQ advocate

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“Out of any movie I’ve made, this is the one people need to talk about – they need to see it,” says Chloë Grace Moretz. “It will change you.”
That might sound like your standard PR-friendly sound bite that gets taught in lesson one at the Hollywood School of Media Training, but in this case we believe it to be infinitely more genuine than that. Why? Because the film in question is The Miseducation of Cameron Post – an adaptation of Emily M. Danforth’s 2012 coming-of-age novel of the same name.

Chloë Grace Moretz – the young actress you’ve seen in Kick-Ass and its sequel, the Carrie remake, and Neighbors 2: Sorority Rising, among other big budget flicks – takes on the title role here; a queer teen caught having sex with her girlfriend at her school prom by the boyfriend she attended it with, only to then be carted off to God’s Promise, a conversion therapy camp in Montana. When it first premiered at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, it was met with critical praise. So much so that it walked off with the Grand Jury Prize for US Drama – widely regarded as the festival’s highest honour.

I had basically taken a little bit of a break from acting for a second to figure out where I wanted to be in my career, the content I wanted to put out, and what was so important to me,” Chloë tells us when we ask at what point when reading the script did she know that she needed to be a part of this project. “The first movie that really ticked all the boxes for me and lit a fire under me was Cameron Post. It was really that that made me want to jump into this project and be a part of it – and it was for a multitude of reasons.” The main one, she says, was because she was completely unaware of how much an issue conversion therapy was – and continues to be – in America.

The statistics are heartbreaking: there are currently 700,000 people in America affected by conversion therapy, while it’s estimated a further 77,000 young people will be subjected to the unethical practice in the next five years. There is absolutely no reliable evidence that this pseudoscientific method is effective. In fact, pretty much all respectable scientific and medical experts consider attempting to change someone’s sexuality from bisexual or homosexual to heterosexual through psychological or spiritual means to be seriously harmful. Yet conversion therapy has so far only been banned in 14 states in the US, and that is just when it comes to minors. In the UK, the government is only just looking into banning the practice after years of campaigning by LGBTQ activists.

It’s an issue that never went away,” Chloë says. “The movie is set in 1993, so in a way you could look at it and think it’s different now, but actually it’s not. If anything, it’s louder, it’s more talked about, and it’s more easily accessible. There are websites now that will help you find any therapist in a 10-mile radius of your home that you can take your kid to tomorrow. So it’s become very readily available and that really shocked me.

What is even more shocking, Chloë adds, is just how far conversion therapy has its grip. “It’s in every religion, it’s in every socio-economic space, it’s in every race, it’s an incredibly widespread issue.” And this is where the power of art comes in. When Chloë says that this is the one movie of hers that she needs people to see, it’s because it could help mobilise real social change when it comes to the conversation around conversion therapy. “Hopefully, from people becoming educated it’ll help them to become advocates to overturn it and make it illegal in their country and their city.

When Chloë says that, it’s not even directed at just the LGBTQ community, but people outside of the rainbow who could be completely unaware that these very real issues still persist in society. And The Miseducation of Cameron Post’s secret weapon? A great big emotional punch that would be difficult for anyone to resist connecting with.

Full interview: gaytimes.co.uk

Categories Interviews Photo shoots Photos

Sonic Youth With Chloë Grace Moretz

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She may be just 21, but CHLOË GRACE MORETZ’s intelligence and outspokenness transcends her years. As she helps to raise awareness of modern-day gay conversion camps with her new film, the actress gets vocal on sexuality, dropping out of blockbusters and why you won’t see her kissing on the street. 

It’s morning at a coffee shop in North Hollywood and Chloë Grace Moretz is telling me about her upcoming break in Provincetown, Massachusetts, with her four older brothers, to celebrate her mother Teri’s 60th birthday (Moretz describes the family’s special bond as “symbiotic”). It’s the actress’ second trip to the gay vacation spot in a month, after visiting for the first time two weeks ago to show her new film, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, at the Provincetown Film Festival. “I’m fully obsessed with it,” she reports. “I have two gay brothers in my family and we love being surrounded by gay people and gay things. We were trying to figure out where to take our mom and we were like, she would love this. She loves biking, she loves lobster, she loves Massachusetts, and it’s so gay that she’ll just f***ing die.

At 21 years old, Moretz, who’s been working since the age of five, is self-possessed, quick-witted and willfully unfiltered. “I’ve done interviews for 15 years so I’m used to them,” she says. She certainly looks the part: a black blazer with fur cuffs; a ruffled, navy-and-red, polka-dot mini wrap dress; white Working Girl Reebok sneakers. “And my Prada,” she adds, referring to the Cahier shoulder bag sitting on the table, gifted to her by the fashion house. “She’s a pretty girl.

By her own admission, Moretz hates taking breaks (the famously prolific actor has worked on two dozen movies since her breakout in 2010’s Kick-Ass). “I’m horrible at vacations,” she says. “I work the entire time. I try not to, but I definitely have an issue with it. I get about four days of sleeping as much as I want and then once I’m caught up, I’m like, I’ve got to do something.

“I’m horrible at VACATIONS, I work the entire time. I get about four days of sleeping as much as I WANT and then I’m like, I’ve got to do SOMETHING”

Recently, however, she bit the bullet and took a year and a half off to – as she puts it – reconfigure her career. “I wanted to reconnect to my job and what I love about acting. I dropped out of some really big movies,” Moretz admits, alluding to projects that included the live-action remake of The Little Mermaid. Surprisingly, she says, “I loved it. Just reading and writing and working and listening and watching. Just soaking up anything I could.” She spent two weeks alone in Tulum, Mexico, on a whim. She lived in a shack on the beach in Santa Barbara for a month. She did ritualistic things like having Sunday dinners at the Laurel Canyon home that she shares with her brother Trevor and their mother, who lives in the guest house; Trevor is the reason Moretz became an actor, helping to raise her and now co-managing her with Teri [Moretz’s father has been out of the picture since she was young]. Moretz asked her mother about growing up as a woman in the South and talked to Trevor and her other brother Colin about growing up gay. “I was like, ‘I never actually asked you what it was like to come out. And you came out under a very religious upbringing, because our family was very Christian Baptist. What did that mean? Were you afraid? What was your process?’

Full interview: net-a-porter.com